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The Genius of the Gael: A Study in Celtic Psychology and Its Manifestations Sophie Bryant

The Genius of the Gael: A Study in Celtic Psychology and Its Manifestations

Sophie Bryant

Published June 1st 2005
ISBN : 9781410224569
Paperback
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 About the Book 

The first chapter deals with the composite Irish people and their character as resting largely on kinship and foster-kinship with the Gael. The last chapter is a study of that educative influence, here called the Gaelic Ethos, by which a race ofMoreThe first chapter deals with the composite Irish people and their character as resting largely on kinship and foster-kinship with the Gael. The last chapter is a study of that educative influence, here called the Gaelic Ethos, by which a race of people may be said to foster---in the spiritual sense---the strangers cast upon their shores. The second chapter deals with the main thesis: it is an imperfect but faithful attempt to analyze the psychology of the Celt as one of many varieties in human kindred. The Gael is distinguished from the Celt as the species best known in Ireland, and for the most part it is the Celt as Gael who is under consideration in these pages. Chapters include: The Composite Irish Nation of Today, The Psychology of the Celt, The Social Genius of the Gael, The Gael in Politics, Evolution of Social Institutions Under the Ancient Gael, The Gael in Literature, The Celt in Respect of Spiritual Insight, and The Gaelic Ethos. Sophie Bryant was the first woman to receive a Doctor of Science in England, her subject being mental and moral philosophy. She was one of the first three women to be appointed to a Royal Commission, the Bryce Commission on Secondary Education in 1894-95, and she was one of the first three women to be appointed to the Senate of London University. While on the Senate she advocated setting up a Day Training College for teachers which eventually became the Institute of Education. Later in 1904, when Trinity College Dublin opened its degrees to women, Bryant was one of the first to be awarded an honorary doctorate. She was also instrumental in setting up the Cambridge Training College for Women which eventually became Hughes Hall, the first postgraduatecollege in Cambridge.